February 28, 2015

Literary Heroine Blog Party

Posted in Bible, Blogging, Books, Jane Austen, Just Life tagged at 6:35 pm by catsinboxes

Q.  Introduce yourself! Divulge your life’s vision, likes, dislikes, aspirations, or something completely random!

 My name is Hayley, and I’m a book-loving, Bible-reading, midwest girl transplanted to Louisville, Kentucky, and working on a degree in Humanities at Boyce College.  

Q.  What, to you, forms the essence of a true heroine?

At risk of sounding like Caroline Bingley extolling the merits of a true lady, a true heroine must have common sense and back-bone.  She must possess a sense of humor and, if at all possible, she must like books!  Even more importantly, she must be empathetic and care about others —not everyone, we can’t all be Jane Bennets— but she must have some connection with other people.   

Q.  Share (up to) four heroines of literature that you most admire and relate to.

  • Elinor Dashwood —Definitely number one!  
  • Emma Woodhouse —I plead guilty of being all too like Emma at times
  • Emily of Deep Valley —I’ve had a lot of waiting periods in my life, especially —like Emily— not going on to college right away.  (Here’s a review written much closer to that time in my life.)  
  • Anne Elliot —I’m not as quiet as Anne, but I do hope that as I grow older, I emulate Jane Austen’s most mature of heroines.

Q.  Five of your favorite historical novels?

  1. Sense and Sensibility
  2. Emma
  3. The Hobbit
  4. Persuasion
  5. To Kill a Mockingbird

Q.  Out of those five books who is your favorite major character and why?

Elinor Dashwood . . . I understand her!

Q.  Out of those five books who is your favorite secondary character and why?

Mr. Knightley —he feels the most “real” of all Jane Austen’s men.  He is a friend first and not afraid to call Emma out on her short-comings.  

Q.  If you were to plan out your dream vacation, where would you travel to – and what would you plan to do there?

I’d travel to the United Kingdom and visit battlefields, bookstores, castles, cathedrals, and museums —as many literary and historical places as I could cram into my vacation.  (Fun fact, I lived in London for 6 weeks when I was 12.  I can’t wait to go back someday!)

Q.  What is your favorite time period and culture to read about?

Ooh, hard!  Right now it would be Regency England, but I love Homefront Britain during WWII, and Pre-Revolutionary War Boston.  

Q.  You have been invited to perform at the local charity concert. Singing, comedy, recitation, tap dancing… what is your act comprised of?

I love poetry, so I’d be happy to recite something, and then I’d finish with a piano solo, probably this one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_UaHl3d8Rlg 

Q.  If you were to attend a party where each guest was to portray a heroine of literature, who would you select to represent?

Hermione Granger; I have both the character and the bushy brown hair! 

Q.  Favorite author(s)?

Besides Jane Austen: Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Goudge, C. S. Lewis, Angie Sage, Dorothy Sayers, Josephine Tey, J. R. R. Tolkien and P. G. Wodehouse. . . to name a few  

Q.  In which century were most of the books you read written?

20th century with several notable exceptions!

Q.  In your opinion, the ultimate hero in all literature is…

Lord Peter Wimsey, my first literary crush 

Q.  In your opinion, the most dastardly villain of all literature is…

Moriarty is a classic but, really?  Lord Voldemort!

Q.  Describe your ideal dwelling place.

Bag End, or a quiet farm in the country 

Q.  Sum up your fashion style in a short sentence.

Classic but relaxed: I love dressing up, but I also love my jeans!

Q.  Three favorite Non-fiction books?

Taking the Bible as a given:

  1. Oxford Companion to English Literature (I love reading this reference book!)
  2. Tempted and Tried by Russell Moore (Wonderful, theological book)
  3. At Home with Beatrix Potter (Beautiful coffee-table book with gorgeous pictures)

Q.  Your duties met for the day, how would you choose to spend a carefree summer afternoon?

Yup, an Indiana Jones hat for me!

I’m imagining a summer day back home in Wisconsin —Kentucky summer days are far too hot!  I’d go walking with Mom, then, after my walk, walk out to the barn to see the horses and go out in the pasture barefoot to socialize (being very careful to mind my feet!)  After that I’d head inside, grab a glass of iced tea mixed with lemonade, and find a nice spot outside to read a book or catch up on journaling.  

Q.  Create a verbal sketch of your dream hat – in such a way as will best portray your true character.

While I’d love a beautiful hat, I’m on the adventurous side, so I’ll go for a Australian oilskin hat or a fedora.  If I didn’t wear a helmet horseback riding, that is what I’d be wearing!

Q.  Share the most significant event(s) that have marked your life in the past year.

Joining Third Avenue Baptist Church in Louisville; I am so thankful for my new “home” church.

Q.  Share the Bible passage(s) that have been most inspiring to you recently.

I love how the psalms are filled with the idea and admonition to wait on the Lord.  Psalm 33:20-22 so clearly ties this waiting with joy and hope in the Lord.  I’m learning to live this daily.

Our soul waits for the LORD; he is our help and our shield.   For our heart is glad in him, because we trust in his holy name.   Let your steadfast love, O LORD, be upon us, even as we hope in you. 

May 21, 2014

Wordsworth Wednesday

Posted in Bible, Creative Writing, Faith, Favorite Quotes, Just Life, Poetry tagged , , , , at 7:31 am by catsinboxes

No, this has nothing to do with Wordsworth except that it has something to do with poetry.  Also, in light of the popularity of Wordless Wednesday, and since in the English language there is not a day of the week to lend alliteration to poetry, I will get creative.  I am not very familiar with Wordsworth, and though I would like to better my acquaintance, I will not quote him at the moment.  Instead, I will share my own poem.

Today, I read D.A. Carson’s commentary on Hebrews 7.  In closing, he urges his readers to meditate upon verses 23-25.

The former priests were many in number, because they were prevented by death from continuing in office, but he holds his priesthood permanently, because he continues forever.  Consequently, he is able to save to the uttermost those who draw near to God through him , since he always lives to make intercession for them.

I love those words.

Sunset on Superior

Praise His name, the Son of David,

Praise His name, the reigning King.

Praise His name, He saves the broken,

Praise His name, He intercedes.

Praise His name, He reigns forever,

Praise His name, He saves the lost.

Praise His name, He is returning,

He vanquished death upon the cross.

June 5, 2013

What’s So Great About Aaron?

Posted in Bible, Faith, Just Life at 9:54 am by catsinboxes

Currently in my Bible reading, I am moving chapter by chapter through several books of the Bible including Leviticus.  And in the past few days, I was really anticipating getting to Leviticus 10 though I couldn’t quite explain why.  It definitely has action and conflict, and it’s shocking to say the least.  Yesterday, I finally reached it, and ended up spending my whole Bible time focused on that chapter!  As I finished up my Bible time, I thought “I should write a blog post with some of the notes I’ve made”, so here it is!

Something I didn’t realize until today is that Nadab and Abihu were probably drunk when they offered profane/unauthorized fire.  I inferred that while reading and confirmed it in the footnotes.  The point here though is that God is jealous for His glory, and “will not allow his holiness to be violated, not even by members of the high priest’s family.”  (ESV notes)  Their installation not even complete yet, and two of the priests –in the vernacular– screw-up with deadly results.

You know, I don’t know why people like the name Aaron so much!  He could speak, sure, but he succumbed easily to peer pressure, he lied, he didn’t always support Moses and he had 2 sons who couldn’t even make it through the priestly installation process!  You can’t judge a man by his offspring, but a look at them will tell you a lot about that man, and I think this holds true for Aaron.   His sons had seen their father not always follow the rules; goodness he heard the 10 commandments and then made a golden calf!  Why shouldn’t they try something different, too???  Being drunk surely wouldn’t have helped their logic either!

What can we learn from Aaron?  In God’s words to Aaron (v.8-11) we see the “three major rules” of the priesthood.  –And this is the only time God speaks directly to Aaron.–

The priests were (courtesy of the ESV footnotes for the breakdown)

  1. To distinguish between the holy and the profane
  2. To separate the clean from the unclean
  3. To teach the people the laws of God

It was a holy calling and one that no Levite could fulfill perfectly.  Aaron couldn’t, his sons couldn’t, none of their children, or children’s children could, until one day a child was born with Levite blood from his mother’s side.  He was the Christ, the anointed one, perfectly fulfilling the roles of prophet, priest, and king.

And that is why I could like the name Aaron, because Aaron, in all his fallibility, pointed toward something –rather, someone– so much greater.  Aaron stands for me, for you, for each of us as we live and sin and screw things up.  We can’t make it on our own, but by God’s grace, there is a way.  A way though the ultimate, perfect priest whose sacrifice made it possible for all of us Aarons to come to God.  Because of Him we can draw close without fear to a most Holy LORD and even call Him, “Father.”  How great is our God!